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Link Tank: TV Blog Coalition Roundup for April 4-6

Televisionary is proud to be a member of the TV Blog Coalition. At the end of each week, we'll feature a roundup of content from our sister sites for your delectation.

This week, I interviewed Battlestar Galactica's Katee Sackhoff and took an advance look at the fourth season opener of Battlestar Galactica. Following Ben Silverman's unveiling of the new NBC schedule for the next 65 weeks or so, I reacted to news that the long-in-development and untitled Office spin-off had been ordered and offered up my own pitch on a possible concept that I called "That Was Easy."

I also sent an open letter to Hell's Kitchen overlord Gordon Ramsay, and--in light of new Dollhouse casting (Olivia Williams, a story broken by yours truly)--I wondered just what ever happened to Joss Whedon's Buffy spin-off Ripper.

Elsewhere in the sophisticated TV-obsessed section of the blogosphere, members of the TV Blog Coalition were discussing the following items...
  • Thought last week's pilot quiz was too easy? Buzz threw down the gauntlet again this week with Spot the Fake Pilot: Reality Edition. (BuzzSugar)
  • Even though he wouldn't spill the identity of the final Cylon, the TV Addict highly recommends you check out our interview with BATTLESTAR GALACTICA's Jamie Bamber [The TV Addict]
  • This week we took a look at some pictures from the new post-strike episode of Moonlight. (Daemon's TV)
  • Mikey finally got around to discussing the racy development in the Buffy the Vampire Slayer comic continuation. (Mikey Likes TV)
  • Pacey and Joey sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G! Find out the other four TV couples that make Rae weak in the knees. (RTVW)
  • Scooter did not have a chance to watch the new season of Battlestar Galactica, but his sourses tell him it was frakking good. (Scooter McGavin's 9th Green)
  • Vance thinks he might just move to Alaska if everything in life there is really as wonderfully dreamy as it is on Men In Trees (Tapeworthy)
  • Nerd alert! Dan surveyed TV nerds from My So-Called Life's Brian Krakow to 30 Rock's Tina Fey to see who's a nerd and who is actually cooler than you are. (TiFaux)
  • After watching this week’s How I Met Your Mother, Jennifer explored the “Ted Mosby Is a Jerk” Web site, rallied for a Robin/Barney romance and got nostalgic for Doogie Howser, M.D. (Tube Talk)
  • Raoul interviewed Katee Sackhoff from Battlestar Galactica. (TV Filter)

Comments

Anonymous said…
Loved the Ted Mosby is a Jerk site - especially since it contained references to Cylons and BSG.

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