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Casting Couch: "Man of Your Dreams" Finds Cast

With the fate of pilot season up in the air until the writers strike comes to an end, studios seem to be pushing ahead with a handful of pilots, rather than the usual dozen or so pilots that a typical year might hold.

NBC is going ahead with multi-camera comedy pilot The Man of Your Dreams, which will go into production as soon as the strike ceases. Pilot, starring Battlestar Galactica's Michael Trucco, revolves around an unrepentant womanizer named Larry who uses his expert skills to help single women find their perfect man.

In addition to BSG, Trucco also starred in the 2006 ABC comedy pilot Him & Us, opposite Kim Catrall and Anthony Stewart Head, and recurred on CW's One Tree Hill.

The Peacock has now announced that it has secured Trucco's co-stars for the comedy pilot. Constance Zimmer (Entourage) will play Liza, Larry's divorced sister who is raising her teenage daughter while running a wedding-planning business. Christina Chang (CSI: Miami), has been cast as Malinda, a gold digger, while RonReaco Lee (Committed) will play Star Wars aficionado/Larry's protege Mitch and Justina Machado (Six Feet Under) plays Liza's overweight but attractive friend and business partner Sheryl.

Stay tuned.

What's On Tonight

8 pm: How I Met Your Mother/Welcome to the Captain (CBS); American Gladiators (NBC; 8-9:30); Gossip Girl (CW); Dance War: Bruno vs. Carrie Ann (ABC; 8-9:30 pm); Prison Break (FOX)

9 pm: Two and a Half Men/New Adventures of Old Christine (CBS); Deal or No Deal (NBC; 9:30-11 pm); Girlfriends/The Game (CW); Notes from the Underbelly (ABC; 9:30-10 pm); Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (FOX)

10 pm: CSI Miami (CBS); October Road (ABC)

What I'll Be Watching

8 pm: Gossip Girl.

It's another chance to catch up on the teen soap. On tonight's repeat episode ("The Wild Brunch"), Blair admits that she knows about Serena's betrayal and then rejects her offer of friendship, Serena brings Dan to Chuck's fundraiser brunch, and Jenny turns to Blair for advice.

8:30 pm: Welcome to the Captain.

While I've already seen the pilot episode for CBS' new midseason comedy, it's worth checking out, if only because it's one of the few first-run scripted series on television these days. On tonight's episode ("Pilot"), a sad sack writer (Fran Kranz) is persuaded by his best bud (Chris Klein) to move into the Hollywood landmark apartment building, El Capitan, already filled to the brim with eccentric personalities, including George Bluth. I mean, Jeffrey Tambor...

9 pm: Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles.

On tonight's installment ("Heavy Metal"), John is separated from his mother and Cameron when they hunt for some stolen cargo, only to discover that the future they're fighting may be far bleaker than any of them imagined.

9:30 pm: Old Christine.

CBS comedy Old Christine begins its third season tonight with "The Big Bang," in which Christine's nerves get the better of her when faced with sleeping with Mr. Harris (Blair Underwood) for the first time and Matthew reconsiders medical school when faced with the identity of his first cadaver. Yes, you read that correctly.

10 pm: No Reservations with Anthony Bourdain on Travel Channel.

It's a brand new season of No Reservations on the Travel Channel; follow enfant terrible chef Anthony Bourdain as he travels the world in search of good food. In tonight's installment, Tony travels to New Orleans to see the city post-Katrina and makes note of what has changed since the Great Storm and what has remained the same.

Comments

Not crazy about this premise but I am a fan of Michael Trucco and might have to give him a shot. It will be interesting to see if he can pull off a lead role.

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