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Link Tank: TV Blog Coalition Roundup for April 25-27

Televisionary is proud to be a member of the TV Blog Coalition. At the end of each week, we'll feature a roundup of content from our sister sites for your delectation.

This week, I dished about Torchwood's second season finale, was thrilled that guilty pleasure Gossip Girl returned with new episodes (and a Bass sweater for Machiavellian Chuck), praised Rob Thomas for his uncanny casting ability on drama pilot Good Behavior (landing former Arrested Development co-star Mae Whitman as Roxy), and thought that this week's 30 Rock was a triumph of comedic wit, with an extended homage to Amadeus.

Also: news about Lucy Liu joining the cast of Dirty Sexy Money, Gavin & Stacey heads to BBC America, Lloyd and Adwoa create a "chamber of love" on Last Restaurant Standing, FOX renews Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, and does anyone not think that Richard and Dale deserve a place in the final two on Top Chef?

But, ultimately, I was really all about the shape of things to come on Lost, which returned this week with a kick-ass installment focusing on Ben that raised as many questions as it answered (hello, Smokey!).

Elsewhere in the sophisticated TV-obsessed section of the blogosphere, members of the TV Blog Coalition were discussing the following items...
  • Buzz played agent to Lauren Graham and asked what her next career move should be. (BuzzSugar)
  • Sandie shared pictures from the set of Moonlight. (Daemon's TV)
  • Marcia liveblogged the UK's BAFTA Television Awards, in which shows most Americans have never heard of took home the big prizes. (Pop Vultures)
  • Rae listened in on a teleconference with Jason Dohring about the return of Moonlight and shares her favorite bits. (RTVW)
  • You soon won't forget Sarah Marshall. Yep, Scooter can write uber-cheesy headlines with the best of them. (Scooter McGavin's 9th Green)
  • This week, the TV Addict set the internet ablaze with his review of the highly anticipated BATTLESTAR GALACTICA prequel CAPRICA [the TV Addict]
  • How I Met Your Mother introduces everyone to Vance's Canada! Welcome, eh! (Tapeworthy)
  • TiFaux launched a new regular feature this week with Dan recruiting some of his gal pals for Ask a Lesbian About This Week's Work Out. This week, they addressed Jackie's new haircut and Rebecca's shouting for attention. (TiFaux)
  • Jennifer was downright giddy after Robin and Barney's kiss on How I Met Your Mother and couldn't resist gushing about the Robin Sparkles-centered episode guest starring James Van Der Beek. And she can't stop singing, "I'm building sandcastles in the sand." (Tube Talk)
  • Kate scoured casting notices until she was able to confirm that yes, there really will be a Wedding of the Year on Gossip Girl (TV Filter)

Comments

Anonymous said…
This week Jace completely ignored BG once again. Come on Jace! Miss your insightful thoughts on the show. I was particularly curious to see what you made of this week's episode, as the first three of this final series have been outstanding, I think, whereas Friday's show was very weak, the religion story-thread completely over-egged and too dominant. It makes me nervous about the final destination for the show.

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