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Link Tank: TV Blog Coalition Roundup for July 11-13

Televisionary is proud to be a member of the TV Blog Coalition. At the end of each week, we'll feature a roundup of content from our sister sites for your delectation.

This week, I gave a rare second chance to HBO's upcoming vampire drama True Blood (from Six Feet Under creator Alan Ball), taking another look at the pilot installment's revised version and the series' second episode, kicking off this September. But did I change my tune about the series this time around?

Elsewhere in the sophisticated TV-obsessed section of the blogosphere, members of the TV Blog Coalition were discussing the following items...
  • Buzz was pretty delighted by her first glimpse of NBC's Kath and Kim. (BuzzSugar)
  • This week, Sandie shared her visit on the set of The Closer. (Daemon's TV)
  • Getting ready for Burn Notice's second season, Rae shares her talk with Props Master Charlie Guanci, Jr. (RTVW)
  • Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, kids of all ages, Scooter McGavin proudly presents to you possibly the greatest television show of all time: I Love Money. (Scooter McGavin's 9th Green)
  • Vance is looking forward to getting burnt all summer with a new season of Burn Notice! (Tapeworthy)
  • In his quest to find something -- anything -- to watch on TV, he uncovered an internet music series based out of France. And, believe you me, the clip he found by Menomena is probably the cutest thing he has seen all year. Honest. (TiFaux)
  • The TV Addict has the scoop on Grace Park's first post - BATTLESTAR GALACTICA project [the TV Addict]
  • Petrozza from Hell's Kitchen badmouthed Matt and Jen and we kinda loved him for it. (TV Filter)

Comments

Anonymous said…
I love Hell's kitchen. Everyone is so over the top, so much drama. Reality shows have taken over television. We love watching people fold under pressure.
Check out how crazy Hollywood is. I work with Motorola, right. They set up a web site for Danica Patrick. She’s the race car driver that just became the first woman to win in the Indy car race series.
There is a Talk Show Spoof Video on the site. It’s pretty funny. The reason why I’m telling you this is that she might be getting a real talk show. How crazy is that; getting a real show off a spoof show? Only in America!

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