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DOA: NBC Kills "Life"

While NBC made several high-profile announcements this morning at their infront presentation to advertisers, one piece of news wasn't included in the press release that the Peacock sent out to press.

Drama series Life, starring Damian Lewis, Sarah Shahi, Adam Arkin, Donal Logue, and Brent Sexton, is definitely dead.

Many held out hope that the Universal Media Studios-produced drama series, created by Rand Ravich, would have landed a midseason slot on NBC's 2009-2010 schedule, despite not garnering a mention in the press release that went out this morning.

Alas, that's not the case.

"It will not be coming back," said NBC Entertainment President Ben Silverman at today's presentation in New York of Life, which wrapped its second season last month.

Wish I had better news for Life fans but it does seem like any hopes for a third season of Life are now officially dead.

Comments

Owen said…
WTF? That sucks! Thanks NBC once again. I wonder why I even bother to start watching their new stuff when they always cancel it.
Jo said…
I am very disappointed, but not surprised. Add this to the Kings cancellation and I am an unhappy camper with NBC these days.

Jace - any chance that another network like USA or FX would pick up Life?
Ally said…
While it's not at all surprising, I still must say -

BOOOOO!
Anonymous said…
Yeah, because we need FIVE HOURS of Jay Leno a week during prime time rather than smart, innovative entertainment like Life.

I am sacrificing chickens and holding out the tiniest sliver of hope for the USA Network. Charlie Crews would fit seamlessly into their "Characters Welcome" line-up.
Anonymous said…
Not surprised.

Just another reason to dislike Silverman. How does he keep that job when the network is tumbling into the toilet? I'm surprised he doesn't just move all the way from product placement to infomercials 24/7.
Anonymous said…
Remember the moment you realized you didn't watch anything on CBS? Yeah, I'm nearly there with NBC. 30 Rock is the only thing keeping me.

For my money, Life was the best show on TV. Brilliant, stylish, moving, funny, amazing acting and writing. I've recced it, pimped it, blogged it, recapped it and picspammed it. I downloaded it on iTunes and bought the DVDs. When things looked bleak, I wrote polite and plaintive emails to network execs. So yeah, this is a sad day for me.

I think a scapegoat might make me feel better, and I choose Leno. Seems like NBC thinks Leno is five times as good as Life. I wish I could do more than discourage people from watching him. Like, I want someone to invent a DVR that takes hours away from a show.
Tempest said…
* sob *

Really, NBC????

Is there any chance this could get picked up by USA? I think it would be a great fit.
V. Salt said…
I admit that I don't get why everyone's ganging up on Leno. He's not the reason people didn't watch your favorite show. If his show wasn't going to fill that time slot, another new (cheap) show would, but nothing would bring "Life" back. Piling on another writer/performer is kinda jerky. The fact that you don't like his brand of humor - and for the record, it's not my style, either - doesn't make it less mean-spirited.

As for "Life"'s cancellation, you should place the blame where it belongs: the audience who preferred to watch something else.
Clarrita said…
I'm so disappointed about LIFE not coming back. I can't wait for Leno to tank. No one needs that much Leno at 10pm.
Sara said…
Oh thats just crap. Thats really all I have to say to NBC.
Jon88 said…
I think Rand should start writing Charlie Crews novels. (I pledge to buy them in hardcover.)
erika said…
NBC made me sad with this news. LIFE was one of my most favorite shows out there. Hey NBC, if you promoted your awesome shows better, maybe you wouldn't have to resort to a schedule full of Leno, Mandel and Trump! Just sayin'...
Anonymous said…
NBC you stink! Move Life to USA where it will be a hit.
Anonymous said…
IS NBC for real????
Life is an awesome show and they would get rid of that and have another crappy talk show at 10:00 (Leno), we don't need more talk shows we need more decent shows and Life was a great show. They need to get with it and bring it back. That was the only thing I watched on NBC so I guess I will no longer be watching anything over there. It is a shame that they would bring this great series to the airways and then take it away. THIS SUCKS.Bring it back. I hope NBC has the lowest ratings ever if they cannot keep the good shows around, I thought they had really lost it bringing Leno to primetime but then I realized that they have taken off Life. I wondered where it had went and then starting searching for when it was returning and then find out it has been cancelled, all I can say is they are idots. I hope they lose tons of money
Jon said…
Whats different about LIFE against other T.V. Crime Drama shows is it's FUNNY!! There's lightness about it. I can't stand to watch that CSI Miami dude with the sunglasses, staring at his shoes everytime he talks to somebody! Why don't they make him a superhero or something?? NBC has blown it big time. I feel like taking a shower after watching L&O SVU to wash the filth off me! I mean how many rapes do you want to watch?

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