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Channel Surfing: "Arrested Development" Script Underway, Bilson Dating "Mother," Mazur Suits Up for "NCIS: Los Angeles," and More

Welcome to your Monday morning television briefing.

Get your frozen bananas ready: it's official. Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz and Jim Vallely are working on script for the highly anticipated feature film version of Arrested Development. Film, which will be produced by Imagine and Fox Searchlight, will once again revolve around the eccentric and highly spoiled Bluth family of Orange County... that is once the producers can iron out what are likely to be numerous scheduling complications. Stay tuned... (Hollywood Reporter)

Rachel Bilson (The O.C.) has been cast in a "potentially pivotal" role on CBS' How I Met Your Mother, leading several to wonder if Bilson will be playing the mom herself, though currently Bilson is signed to only appear in one episode. Or is that just a smokescreen? Hmmm... (E! Online's Watch with Kristin)

Monet Mazur (40 Days and 40 Nights) has been cast in a potentially recurring role on CBS' NCIS: Los Angeles, where she will play Natalie Buccola, a secret service agent who becomes romantically entangled with Chris O'Donnell's character. She'll make her first appearance in the sixth episode of the season. (Entertainment Weekly's Ausiello Files)

Entertainment Weekly's Hollywood Insider talks to the cast of HBO's Curb Your Enthusiasm about the Seinfeld reunion plotline that kicked off in last night's episode of Curb. "I don’t think it connects to anything from where we left off, and that might be its brilliance," said Jason Alexander. "We always thought about ‘Well, what would we do next? Are we going to be able to get out of jail?’ and this one is light years beyond that already." (Entertainment Weekly)

FOX has given a script order to single-camera comedy project The Intruders. Project, from Warner Bros. Television and Wonderland Sound and Vision, will follow the exploits of a wealthy father from Arizona who falls in love with a low-life single mom and moves her and her family onto his estate with his kids. Project is written and executive produced by Danny Comden. (Hollywood Reporter)

ABC has shifted the premiere of Season Four of Ugly Betty from this Friday to next Friday, October 16th, where it will kick off with a two-hour opener featuring Kristen Johnston, Lynn Redgrave, Judy Gold, Smith Cho, and Yaya DaCosta (via press release)

The Chicago Tribune's Maureen Ryan has an exclusive first look at Paris Hilton's guest turn on this Thursday's episode of Supernatural on the CW. (Chicago Tribune's The Watcher)

Aaron Tveit will reprise his role as Tripp Vanderbilt, the wealthy cousin of Chase Crawford's Nate Archibald, in at least six episodes of the CW's Gossip Girl. Entertainment Weekly's Michael Ausiello reports that Tripp will made a bid for public office and Nate will be drawn into his campaign. (Entertainment Weekly's Ausiello Files)

Cartoon Network has announced that Batman: The Brave and the Bold will return to the lineup with new episodes beginning Friday, October 16th. Series, which returns for a second season of retro-tinged Bat mayhem, will settle into the 7:30 pm ET/PT timeslot, followed by Star Wars: The Clone Wars and Ben 10: Alien Force. (Futon Critic)

Stay tuned.

Comments

I'm thrilled to hear that the Arrested Development movie might actually happen. I'm going to go fire up the Cornballer in celebration!
W Loomis said…
Batman: The Brave and the Bold is an excellent show. It's campy, funny, and the animation is great. Glad to hear there will be more eps.

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