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Production Delayed Again for FOX's "24"

Stop all the clocks, as W. H. Auden once said.

Production has once again been delayed on FOX's real-time thriller 24, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Shooting was slated to begin on the seventh season of 24 on August 27th but has been pushed back until September 10th in order for the writing staff on the series to stockpile a number of scripts.

It's the second delay for 24 this season (production was originally meant to resume in late July) as the series' producers jettisoned a storyline that would have been set in Africa and have scrambled to find a new overarching plot for Jack Bauer. (What is certain, however, is that there will be no CTU this season.)

Stay tuned as this story develops, but it's not a good sign for a series to scramble like this (even when the launch date isn't until January), especially following a season that critics and viewers alike agreed was seriously lackluster.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Yeah, I don't know that I can even stomach watching this year, especially if the writers don't even have their act together to get a script out on time to shoot. Delays are one thing but to keep admitting that they scrapped plans and don't know what they are doing make me think that next season will be even worse than #6.
Anonymous said…
You'd think that after the last dismal season they'd want to get their act together and put out something really spectacular. I guess that's not the case.
The CineManiac said…
Having already dropped 24 once in it's run (after season 2 and the horrendous cougar subplot) and gearing up to have a child next January, I can honestly say this is nothing but goodnews for me, as it's a show I can drop and make time for the family.
So far Fox has lost me on two series, between this and the fact that Prison Break ended with Michael back in prison, Fox's stock just keeps dropping in my book, and they really have no new series I want to watch. (And I might still be stinging from the canceling of Drive, which brought back memories of Wonderfalls, The Inside, and ones of other series I loved)
I guess I'll be watching House, and the other networks this upcoming season.
Anonymous said…
Hey, 24, I'm so over you all ready and you haven't even started up yet.
Anonymous said…
I second that, Wes. 24 can go on permanent vacation, for all I care.

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