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Talk Back: BBC America's "Gavin & Stacey" Season Two Finale

I won't lie to you: I couldn't help myself and watched last night's Gavin & Stacey season finale all over again last night. I'm a sucker for the laughs-and-tears combo of the brilliant British import.

You've already read my advance review of Gavin & Stacey's sophomore season finale (the series returns this month in the UK with a Christmas special), which aired Stateside last night, but I am curious to see what you thought of the episode, which featured the birth of Nessa and Smithy's baby, a truce between Bryn and Dave of Dave's Coaches (who knows Bryn and Jason's secret about that fateful fishing trip), and, of course, a possible reconciliation between estranged couple Gavin and Stacey.

Did you think it fitting that Gavlar and Stacey reconnected after seeing Nessa with baby Neil? Did you buy the happy coincidence that Nessa's dad and Smithy both happened to share the same first name? Did you howl with laughter at Nessa's choice of delivery position? Want to scream at Pam to stop trying so hard to please Stacey? And are you going to miss this delightful series as much as I am?

Talk back here.

P.S. You might be asking yourself, "what's occurrin'?" after seeing the above picture of Nessa, which is decidedly NOT from the season finale, but I couldn't help myself as it sums up nearly everything we love about Vanessa Shanessa Jenkins. Tidy.

Comments

Anonymous said…
I thought this was a great finale and I am glad that there is an Xmas special to look forward to whenever BBCA decide to air it. Probably not until next Xmas I guess. I cried a bit at the end seeing Gavin and Stacy kissing and I hope they do stay together and I loved that Smithy kissed Nessa after seeing the baby but it was interrupted by Dave. I miss it already.
Anonymous said…
Great episode but I wouldn't expect anything less from G&S. I do hope that it means that Gavin and Stacey decide to give their marriage another chance and don't split up, even though the Essex/Barry issues will still be there. I get that Stacey misses her family and that living with Pam and Mick can't be a walk in the park either but it made me really sad to see that she was blaming everything on Gavin and that she didn't love him anymore. Very realistic though from an emotional POV. Hoping that Smithy and Nessa will finally realize that they are meant for each other at Christmas time!
Anonymous said…
Glad to see you Yanks love this as much as we do! GAVIN & STACEY is one of the best programmes the Beeb is making right now and I'm crushed that a Series 3 isn't a certainty.
TVBlogster said…
My cable company doesn't have BBC America, so I have to wait until this episode is uploaded onto iTunes - my one stop shopping for the latest in British TV comedy.

I adore Gavin and Stacy. The humor isn't forced but grows out of human condition and lovely characters with normal quirks. Nessa is indeed my favorite, played by Ruth Jones - who is also the co-creator and writer, alongside James Cordon who plays Smithy. It appears they are a sensation in England. What a shame series three hasn't been green lit yet.

I can't read everyone's comments. Don't want to be spoiled, but had to speak up.
Anonymous said…
A great finale to a great season. It had just the right amount of laughs and those bittersweet moments that make me love this show so darn much. I don't know how they manage to balance the true (Gavin and Stacey's emotional turmoil) with the absurd (Nessa's birth) and have it come out so perfectly!
Melissa said…
I finally had a chance to watch this (on my iphone sitting in my car waiting for a store to open on Saturday - love technology). So satisfying - I cried like a baby - which I rarely do at TV shows or movies. Picture perfect.

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