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Link Tank: TV Blog Coalition Roundup for Feb. 6-8

Televisionary is proud to be a member of the TV Blog Coalition. At the end of each week, we'll feature a roundup of content from our sister sites for your delectation.

This week, I talked to Joss Whedon about Dollhouse, celebrated Televisionary's third birthday, broke stories about Christina Wayne quitting AMC and ABC cutting back Cupid's episodic order, and chatted with Fringe's Mark Valley.

I also reviewed the post-Super Bowl episode of The Office, discussed this week's episodes of Lost, FX's Damages, the 3D episode of Chuck, BBC America's Last Restaurant Standing, and 30 Rock's deliciously loopy "Generalissimo," and marveled at the latest installment of HBO's deliciously taut polygamist drama Big Love.

All this and news about HBO renewing Big Love for a fourth season, TNT renewing Leverage for a second season, ABC Family canceling Kyle XY, the CW bringing Reaper back earlier than expected, BBC America acquiring Being Human, Survivors, and Season Three of Primeval, Caprica, the Dollgrind ad on FOX, Flight of the Conchords, and Torchwood.

Elsewhere in the sophisticated TV-obsessed section of the blogosphere, members of the TV Blog Coalition were discussing the following items...
  • Buzz wondered what's been driving viewers away from Ugly Betty this year. (BuzzSugar)
  • Rae's got Lost fever – kinda like the Island sickness sans the bloody nose and inevitable death – and is proud of her new theory about the lack of successful pregnancies on the island. (RTVW Online)
  • Most will think that I Love Money is either the downfall of Western Civilization or the greatest thing on television. Of course it just may be both. (Scooter McGavin's 9th Green)
  • Now that the spoilers are out, Vance handicaps the alleged Top 36 American Idols and needs help making his picks for an Idol pool! (Tapeworthy)
  • Scrubs has its faults, we all know this, but Jesse decided that people should give it a little more credit than it gets. (TiFaux)
  • This week, theTVaddict.com posted a handy-dandy downloadable and printable calendar with all of your must-see February TV premieres and events. (the TV Addict)
  • Heather got her mitts on an Eli Stone goodie bag from her friends at the UK's Sci-Fi channel and, generous soul she is, decided to give it away. All you have to do to be in with a chance of winning it is answer one ridiculously easy question… (TV Spy)

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