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San Diego Comic-Con 2010: Questions for the V Cast and Crew?

They have arrived... in San Diego.

The cast and crew of ABC's alien drama V will once again invade San Diego Comic-Con with a panel on Saturday afternoon in Ballroom 20 that will be moderated by yours truly.

To that end, I'm collecting any questions you might have for V showrunner Scott Rosenbaum or cast members Elizabeth Mitchell, Morris Chestnut, Joel Gretsch, Logan Huffman, Laura Vandervoort, Charles Mesure, Morena Baccarin, and Scott Wolf, all of whom will be making the pilgrimage down to the annual convention next week.

While I can't promise they'll get asked, I'll be reviewing questions as I write my own for the panel, which will feature the cast and crew in a Q&A session as well as a brief screening.

Feel free to email or use the comments section below to offer up potential questions. Hope to see you all down in San Diego!

Comments

KriZia said…
This is for the whole cast, I would guess: What compelled you the most about the original V series that persuaded you to become involved in this re-made version?

And if you're able to take a second question: What would you personally like to see occur in season 2 of V?

(Jace, if you do ask this question, I'm sure you could phrase it more eloquently than I did. Also, I don't know that I'll make the panel - it all depends on how compelling the Exhibit Hall is that day, whether I'm able to score autograph tickets to the V signing and how crowded B20 is - but I know you'll make a fantastic moderator even if I don't get to see it for myself)

Thanks for taking questions!
Anonymous said…
what's going to happen in season 2? when does the show come back? what was the red smoke?
Summer said…
Is Anna's number 2 (the guy who met with Hodges) good or bad? He seems two faced with Hodges, Anna, Lisa, AND the reporter, so it is a very good acting job to know who he is really aligned with.

(Perhaps that is even one that you can answer Jace!)
Prez said…
Can we expect a major showdown between Lisa and Anna in season 2?
Betty said…
Will Charles Mesure be a regular in season two or a guest star?
Nina said…
Hello!

Is Erica going to work closely with Anna this season as an "ally"? What other relationships might change or progress?
FergieFan said…
What's the thing/revelation that shocked you the most in season 1?

What were some of the funniest things that happened on set while shooting the episodes?
Bean said…
Basically, what's the deal with Jack and Erica?! I mean, come on!
Tash said…
For any of the cast members:
Once you got into your character, were they what you expected or did you realise that they weren’t what you thought they would be?
Maliza said…
This question is for Morena: in one of the episodes when Anna is administering bliss she invites her people to feel the light of her divine touch.

Does this mean that Anna told her people she was a god? I know some of the humans think she is, and she never corrected them.

But does she think she's one? Is that why the fifth column hates her so much, because they found out she lied about what she is?

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