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Link Tank: TV Blog Coalition Roundup for Sept. 12-14

Televisionary is proud to be a member of the TV Blog Coalition. At the end of each week, we'll feature a roundup of content from our sister sites for your delectation.

This week, I interviewed The Office's Amy Ryan and Paul Lieberstein about Season Five of the NBC comedy, gave an advance review of the CW's new teen drama Privileged, offered talk backs on the series premieres of HBO's True Blood and FOX's Fringe, and gave five reasons why I loved the latest episode of Mad Men.

Oh, and I was interviewed by E! Online's Kristin dos Santos in the latest issue of USA Weekend.

Elsewhere in the sophisticated TV-obsessed section of the blogosphere, members of the TV Blog Coalition were discussing the following items...
  • What was in the water during 2004-05? Buzz salutes the TV season that brought us Lost, House, and Grey's Anatomy. (BuzzSugar)
  • This week, Sandie share some news and spoilers from Supernatural's new season. (Daemon's TV)
  • After listening to the media debate if they were bias or not for a whole week, Scooter has this to tell them: stop making the new and go back to reporting it you morons. (Scooter McGavin's 9th Green)
  • To celebrate the season (and series) premieres of Gossip Girl and Privileged, we're giving away several copies of the books that started these shows. (RTVW)
  • Vance is excited that So You Think You Can Dance Canada has finally started AND starts off in his hometown of Toronto where apparently, Canadians really CAN dance! (Tapeworthy)
  • TiFaux got a slew of new contributors this week! To start off her blogging reign at TiFaux, Marisa did a critical analysis comparing Lost and Fringe, discussing the appearance of crazy animals and mad scientists. (TiFaux)
  • This week, theTVaddict.com put forth our theory as to who Kelly Taylor's Baby Daddy is! [The TV Addict]
  • Raoul got all the dirt on the new season of The Sarah Connor Chronicles straight from Lena Headey and exec producer Josh Friedman (TV Filter)

Comments

Anonymous said…
True Blood resembles Heroes at first glance (just rented the first episode from Blockbuster)... for some reason this show makes me want to eat Cajun food and drink cheap beer

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